Calling It!

Love affair with a Fiddle Leaf Fig

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I have been coveting Fiddle Leaf Figs since I read about them a year and a half ago on Emily Henderson's blog.  I have just the planter, and just the spot, but I have been doing long stints outside of the country, so it never seems like a good time to bring a new plant into my life.     

The reason fiddle leaf figs have run away with my heart is their scale and irregularity.  They have large stiff asymmetrical leaves and can grow in unexpected ways. They are contemporary sculptures, but alive. 

Emily Henderson's old living room

Emily Henderson's old living room

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Jonathan Adler 

Jonathan Adler 

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Fiddle leaf figs (ficus lyrata ) is native to western Africa.  It grows in lowland tropical rain forests.  As a houseplant, it usually stays shorter and fails to flower or fruit.  

It was awarded the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. To qualify for this ludicrous award, it must meet the following criteria.  

  • must be available
  • must be of outstanding excellence for garden decoration or use
  • must be of good constitution
  • must not require highly specialist growing conditions or care
  • must not be particularly susceptible to any pest or disease
  • must not be subject to an unreasonable degree of reversion.

Emily Henderson

Emily Henderson

Once I learned about fiddle leaf figs, I started seeing them everywhere: in IKEA, in Home Depot, in people's homes, and in television and film sets.

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 10

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 10

The Good Wife: Season 4, Episode 20

The Good Wife: Season 4, Episode 20

Mistresses: Season 1, Episode 1

Mistresses: Season 1, Episode 1

Arrested Development: Season 4, Episode 15

Arrested Development: Season 4, Episode 15

Calling it: Decorating with Dead Peacocks

If you think decorating with taxidermy is awesome, then you should check out this post on Chinoiserie Chic.  

Taxidermy has been a presence in interior design since the first hunter mounted a head on his wall (and probably before because I didn't research this at all).  Instead of tackling taxidermy as a whole, I am going to focus on one animal: the peacock.

The peacock is one of the most ostentatious animal in the world.  Its feather have been used for all sorts of things and its likeness has been put on anything that is googlable. It's name has been turned into a verb, and  is used to describe dressing up to get attention.  But somehow nothing is more hedonistic than stuffing the bird in all it's glory and having it sit on a side table.  I want one. 

Anna Sui's home

Anna Sui's home

Jeffrey Bilhuber - Elle Decor

Jeffrey Bilhuber - Elle Decor

Elle Decor

Elle Decor

Alexis and Trevor Traina's home  - Vogue

Alexis and Trevor Traina's home  - Vogue

Celery Kemble - Lonny

Celery Kemble - Lonny

Celery Kemble - Lonny

Celery Kemble - Lonny

And one flamingo:

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I saw a peacock (and many other stuffed dead things) a while back at Inheritance, at Beverly and Crescent Heights Blvd.  I'm sure it's a million dollars, as is everything else in that store.

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Calling it! - Dalmatian Dots

In this first edition of Calling It!, a semi regular column where Emma & I put ourselves out there & call an emerging  trend (or a least something that’s trending in our heads). Either way, it’ll always be something we’re eager and excited to use and see more of.

So I’m jumping feet first into:

Dalmatian Dots

Not so much the literal patterns of a puppy (or hides! No Cruellas here!!); but more of the irractic, slightly smudged alterative to poka dots. They’re feminine without being cutesy and a relaxed alternative to it’s ultra preppy cousin. Pillows, upholstery, wallpaper- I’m excited to sneak into places that need a little pep.

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