Mad Men

Wait! That's my chair!

Doppelganger chair

Doppelganger chair

I was doing a google image search for "famous dining chairs" (because that's what I do), and the very first image was of my dining room chair...in worse condition and with a pretty unflattering seat fabric.  

But nonetheless....What! 

My dining room

My dining room

The chair image led me to a blog, and blog showed me a picture of my chair on Mad Men.

Mad Men: Season 2

Mad Men: Season 2

Clearly this is a woman after my heart.

The screen grab is from an episode where Don goes to California (whaaa!) and fixes a chair for an old friend (aka the real wife of the real Don Draper)

The Wallpaper is Back

A while back, I wrote about the wallpaper in Mad Men vs. The Americans.  The thesis was that cutting edge wallpaper in the 60's, would become mass produced by the 80's and used in suburban homes.

Mad Men - 1960's

Mad Men - 1960's

The Americans - 1980's

The Americans - 1980's

Now there is another data point:

The Skeleton Twins - Gay bar on Dyke Night

The Skeleton Twins - Gay bar on Dyke Night

The trailer for The Skeleton Twins was just released and The Americans's wallpaper is featured in a bar set.  This would fit with the thesis because this bar probably put this wallpaper up in the 80's and has spent the next 30 years regretting it. 

Mad Men Called

I enjoyed watching the phone call between Don and Megan from Season 7, Episode 7 of Mad Men because it is so obvious that THEY ARE IN DIFFERENT PLACES!

Mad Men: Season 7, Episode 7

Mad Men: Season 7, Episode 7

Don is in a ridged, dark, conventional world with heavy drapes and dark wood.  The chair he sits in reminds me of the chair in House of Cards.  It is very traditional, but with unexpected whimsical woodwork.   

House of Cards

House of Cards

Megan, on the other hand, is in sunny Los Angeles (a city very dear to me).  She is sitting in a cord chair in the sunshine, surrounded by west coast potted plants and a California color pallet.  Honestly, things haven't changed too much here. This is what it looks like.  

Mad Men at the Dresden

Once again, The Dresden, a restaurant in Los Felize (Los Angeles), pops up in a TV show.  I posted about this location when it appeared in The Spoils of Babylon, and now Mad Men.  The mid-century room is stunning, although the food was pretty lack luster.

And I am so excited that this season of Mad Men spends more time in Los Angeles!

Mad Men: Season 7, Episode 1 - The Dresden Restaurant

Mad Men: Season 7, Episode 1 - The Dresden Restaurant

Love affair with a Fiddle Leaf Fig

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I have been coveting Fiddle Leaf Figs since I read about them a year and a half ago on Emily Henderson's blog.  I have just the planter, and just the spot, but I have been doing long stints outside of the country, so it never seems like a good time to bring a new plant into my life.     

The reason fiddle leaf figs have run away with my heart is their scale and irregularity.  They have large stiff asymmetrical leaves and can grow in unexpected ways. They are contemporary sculptures, but alive. 

Emily Henderson's old living room

Emily Henderson's old living room

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Jonathan Adler 

Jonathan Adler 

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Fiddle leaf figs (ficus lyrata ) is native to western Africa.  It grows in lowland tropical rain forests.  As a houseplant, it usually stays shorter and fails to flower or fruit.  

It was awarded the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. To qualify for this ludicrous award, it must meet the following criteria.  

  • must be available
  • must be of outstanding excellence for garden decoration or use
  • must be of good constitution
  • must not require highly specialist growing conditions or care
  • must not be particularly susceptible to any pest or disease
  • must not be subject to an unreasonable degree of reversion.

Emily Henderson

Emily Henderson

Once I learned about fiddle leaf figs, I started seeing them everywhere: in IKEA, in Home Depot, in people's homes, and in television and film sets.

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 10

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 10

The Good Wife: Season 4, Episode 20

The Good Wife: Season 4, Episode 20

Mistresses: Season 1, Episode 1

Mistresses: Season 1, Episode 1

Arrested Development: Season 4, Episode 15

Arrested Development: Season 4, Episode 15

Are 60's and 80's the same?

The Americans: Season 1, Episode 10

The Americans: Season 1, Episode 10

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I was watching The Americans and became intrigued by the kitchen set.  The show is about KGB agents undercover in the early 80's posing as the perfect American family.  

I was planning on writing about patterned back-splashes (because who doesn't love that), but then the next show I watched was an episode of Mad Men.  Low and behold, a very very similar wallpaper was used in Ted Chaough mid 60's office.  

 

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 9

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 9

The wallpaper in Mad Men is called Trippy by Graham & Brown.  It goes for $60/roll.  

Does it strike anyone as odd that virtually the same wall paper can define two stylistically different eras?   

Or maybe it makes perfect sense.  The sets of Mad Men are supposed to be sleek and modern.  The colors, and patters are were chosen because they were the most current and cutting edge design.   

Fast forward twenty years and we see a stereotypical suburban family kitchen with the same colors and patters.  As the cool slick design of the 60's gets mass produced, these average suburbanites purchase the status symbol decor items which have finally reached their local shops and catalogs.  But they are twenty years two late.  

What was actually on trend in the 80's was probably something that looked a little more like this: 

Panache Interiors

Panache Interiors

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